Seeking Nominations for Chair-elect and Delegate-at-large Positions

Nominations are now open for the OSAF Chair-elect and Delegate-at-large positions, and self-nominating is welcome. The nomination period will close on October 15, and candidate statements are due to wattsa@forestry.org before November 1. Voting will open Tuesday, November 1 and close November 15.

Questions? Please contact wattsa@forestry.org.

Catch the Premier of The Big Burn: American Experience on September 7, 2022

The Big Burn: American Experience will air on KCTS on September 7, 2022, at 10:00 p.m. This documentary is based upon Timothy Egan’s book, The Big Burn: Teddy Roosevelt and the Fire that Saved America.

To learn more about the documentary, visit https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/films/burn/#film_description.

Jeff Grogan, CF Selected as 2022 Presidential Field Forester

Congratulations to Jeff Grogan, CF for being honored as the 2022 Presidential Field Forester for District 2! This award recognizes members who have dedicated their professional careers to the application of forestry on the ground using sound scientific methods and adaptive management strategies.

Jeff is a forest planner for Weyerhaeuser’s Southern Oregon Region, and he specializes in forest inventory, GIS, and data systems. He is always looking for and supporting ways to make data accessible in the field and data collection more efficient, providing forest managers with the information needed to make the best possible decisions. Jeff was an important member of the team that planned and managed the salvage of tens of thousands of acres and hundreds in board feet following the 2020 Holiday Farm Fire.

To learn more about Jeff’s accomplishment’s, read The Forestry Source August 2022 issue.

Dan Rees, CF selected as 2022 Presidential Field Forester

Congratulations to Dan Rees, CF for being honored as the 2022 Presidential Field Forester for District 1! This award recognizes members who have dedicated their professional careers to the application of forestry on the ground using sound scientific methods and adaptive management strategies.

Much of Dan’s career and work has been carried out on military lands throughout interior Alaska, where the primary objective of land management is often tied to enhancing military training objectives. As a result, management intensity may range from very intensive applications to more extensive management regimes in combination with military training objectives and forest landscape sustainability and enhancement.

To learn more about Dan’s accomplishment’s, read The Forestry Source August 2022 issue.

It’s Time to Volunteer at the Washington State Fair!

For a number of years, the WSSAF has hosted a booth at the Washington State Fair. Most exhibitors at The Fair pay a substantial amount, but after many years of working with The Fair and the longtime dedication of many people such as John Bergvall, and the building superintendent who is a fellow SAFer, we have been invited back each year without a fee. Others in the building include Wash. State Trappers, Washingtonians for Wildlife, Tacoma Water, Rails to Trails, Boy Scouts, and others.

WSSAF needs volunteers to help staff the booth and provide outreach to the public for our profession. In return for your time, volunteers receive free admission to The Fair and access to free parking. To sign up for volunteer shifts, please fill out this form https://forms.gle/gHhrn87yksdYTfyAA.

Alaska SAF Honors Award Recipients at Annual Meeting

Alaska SAF held their annual meeting in Fairbanks on May 17-18 and presented three awards at the annual awards banquet.

Tom St. Clair (L) receiving his award from Ed Morgan (R), AKSAF Chair

Tom St. Clair is the 2022 recipient of the Forester of the Year award.  Tom currently serves as the Regional Forester for the Alaska Region of the Bureau of Indian Affairs and is the chair-elect for the SAF Yukon River Chapter. He played a key role in organizing this year’s annual meeting, and is active in chapter affairs, field trips, and educational programs. Within the Alaska fire community, he is an active member of the Alaska Wildland Fire Coordinating Group (AWFCG), an interagency organization that provides leadership, coordination, and implementation of policy, direction, and standards for incident management. He is also a well-respected trainer and presenter of forestry and fire management education. Tom’s leadership within SAF and the Alaska fire community is outstanding, and it is an honor to present Tom St. Clair with the Alaska Forester of the Year award.

The 2022 Service to Forestry award is presented to Tamara Boeve. She has been very supportive of the Cook Inlet chapter’s annual tree seedling sale, which was started in the early 1970’s. For many years, she has been instrumental in providing outreach in the Matanuska Valley to connect landowners with Cook Inlet chapter, which provides seedlings for properties that have been burned over or impacted by forest insects. Her plaque will be awarded at an upcoming Cook Inlet chapter meeting.

Dan Rees (2nd from L), Yukon River chapter chair, receives the Alaska chapter of the year award, flanked by CEO Terry Baker (L), President Chris Maisch (2nd from R), and AKSAF Chair Ed Morgan (R).

Alaska’s Yukon River chapter is the recipient of the 2022 Chapter of the Year award. Despite the challenges associated with the pandemic, Yukon River chapter has maintained an active continuing education program utilizing virtual meetings and field trips that continue to engage current members and attract new members. Congratulations to the Yukon River chapter!

Foresters’ Fund Supports Douglas County Forestry Tour

In 2020, OSAF member Alicia Christiansen was awarded a Foresters Fund grant for $2290 for the “Douglas County Reforestation Education for Fifth Grade Students” project. The project goal was to add in a reforestation activity to the Douglas County School Forestry Tour, an educational event offered to all Douglas County 5th grade students each year. The 2022 Tour was held May 4-6 at the Glide Education Forest near Glide, Oregon. Over 550 students attended the Tour this year, which is anticipated to grow as the pandemic gets farther out in our rearview mirror. Normal participation at the Tour is usually upwards of 800 students.

Photo courtesy of Alicia Christiansen

During the “Tour,” students spent the morning in the woods rotating between stations learning about different forestry and natural resource topics. After lunch, we gathered and played forest-themed games. The reforestation activity took the place of an old game.

For this activity, we built a 25-foot-long planter box (with pecky cedar donated by C&D Lumber) and filled it with soil. Private timber companies and the BLM donated 1000 Douglas-fir seedlings, which the students practiced planting in the box using garden trowels. Each teacher was sent home with a bundle of seedlings to hand out to their students. Each seedling was bagged individually and contained a planting instruction card that also provided details on our state tree. Oregon Women in Timber and SAF collaborated to lead the reforestation activity and work with the kids, so they understood how to properly plant and care for a tree.

Overall, this event was a huge hit! The local paper, the News Review, wrote a nice article about the Tour and it mentions this project and SAF: https://www.nrtoday.com/news/douglas-county-forestry-tour-returns-for-59th-time-after-two-year-hiatus-with-a-new/article_5557cb31-995f-514e-89fd-a062756d81d6.html.

Congratulations to the 2022 WSSAF Award Winners

A fixture of every annual meeting is recognizing the accomplishments of WSSAF members and chapters. At the 2022 WSSAF Annual Meeting, two deserving individuals and SAF chapter were recognized.

Forester of the Year – Andy Perleberg
Andy is an associate professor/regional extension specialist with Washington State University, a position he has held since 2008. He is also a certified instructor and trainer for the Washington Tree Farm Program. The nomination was primarily in recognition of his chairmanship of the 2021 WSSAF Annual Meeting. As the general chair, he was responsible for the entire program and all logistics that went into this educational effort.

Chapter of the Year – Mid-Columbia SAF Chapter

2021 Washington State Chair – Josh Meek

Again, congratulations on your accomplishments!

CULTIVATING LEADERS OF TOMORROW

A guest post by Vicky Scharlau, Interim Executive Director, Agriculture and Forestry Education Foundation

Violence broke out, people were arrested, some were beaten, shots were fired, vehicles were damaged, a bridge was burned. This could be the news from last week, but I want to take you back to Washington’s “Fish Wars” of the ’60s and ’70s. Sport and commercial fishing industries were competing with Native American tribes. The lawsuit that followed redefined the roles of tribes in natural resource management in the Pacific Northwest, leading eventually to the Timber/Fish/Wildlife Agreement (TFW), which was signed in the early 1980s as a new way to manage natural resources with tribes, loggers, environmentalists and agencies working together on practices.

Credit for TFW is given to two strong leaders: Billy Frank Jr., a Nisqually tribal leader, and Stu Bledsoe, an Ellensburg rancher turned politician. What these two men accomplished with TFW showed all natural resource industries, including agriculture, the need for and value of aggressively pursuing their needs and explaining them to the public—especially as it related to public policy. 

As he worked on TFW, Stu Bledsoe also drove the first efforts to build a natural resources leadership program in Washington state, patterned after other state programs.

Leadership. Some will say, “I know it when I see it.” What if you didn’t have to wait to stumble upon someone with leadership skills? What if you could build leaders? Take raw talent and allow that talent to grow, to bloom, to excel? Would you be interested? 

Now in its 45th year, the AgForestry Leadership Program has graduated over 1,000 leaders in agriculture, forestry and fisheries. Leaders that help advance their industries through understanding, education and empowerment. Leaders who understand and navigate issues in the public policy arena. 

The program spans 18 months with 11 multiday seminars, plus a week in Washington, D.C., and two weeks in a foreign country. The seminars build leadership skills but also group dynamics and public speaking; working with the media; social issues; state and federal government; forestry issues and agriculture issues; transportation; the Columbia River system; and crime and corrections.

But the AgForestry program of 1977 will not be effectual in 2027.

To continue intentional impact and deliver adult leadership development through training, programming and experiential learning, well, one needs to look to the future: a future with Gen X, Gen Y and Gen Z — then comes Generation Alpha! It is already clear that the target audience of tomorrow is different and has very different values, learning styles and expectations. AgForestry needs to evaluate and retool to ensure its leadership program remains relevant, attracts high-quality candidates, makes an impact with graduates and continues to resonate with grantors, alumni, contributors and stakeholders. 

I am a graduate of Class 10 and was barely 30 years old at the time. AgForestry changed my life and my professional trajectory and taught me much, most importantly to help others find their voice and facilitate the “process” toward public policy. A process that is often like watching paint dry, but necessary, needed and often long overdue. I found I could make a difference by not being the loudest voice in the room. 

If you look closely, you can spot an AgForestry graduate. And if you know a recent graduate, you are no doubt amazed and impressed with the transformation that occurred before your eyes. Graduates emerge as different people. As they should, after a highly competitive selection process, seminars covering 18 months, and at least 58 days of required time and attendance. Astonishingly, the cost to a participant is just $6,000. The actual cost is over $40,000 — offset by contributions from grants, alumni and other stakeholders who value leadership. The total investment in each class is $750,000. 

The Agriculture and Forestry Education Foundation, which oversees the AgForestry Leadership Program, looks for production candidates — key or up-and-coming decision-makers from farming, forestry, fishing or natural resource entities or who spend their time in hands-on activities. Agriculture, forestry and natural resources include producers (farmer, forester and fisher), processor/shippers, and marketing/salespeople. It also includes education, law, finance, insurance and government agencies who serve the natural resources sector. Those in fields such as the environment, media, research, labor and public relations who demonstrate strong connections to natural resource industries are also considered. 

Applications for Class 44 will be accepted until April 30. The first seminar is set to start in October at Washington State University. To learn more, there are Q&A sessions on Wednesday, April 6 from 10–11 a.m. and the last one is Monday, April 18 from 1-2 p.m.

To learn more or to start the application process, go to: agforestry.org/prospects.

To invest in future leaders, go to: agforestry.org/donate.

We cultivate leaders.

Scholarship opportunity for high school seniors studying forestry

The Washington State Sustainable Forestry Initiative® (SFI) Implementation Committee (WASIC) is accepting scholarship applications from students pursuing an education in forestry or natural resources.

The scholarship is available to high school seniors who will be attending full-time (at least 12 units) during the 2022-23 school year, a forestry or natural resource program at one of the following schools:
• University of Washington, Seattle
• Washington State University, Pullman
• Green River Community College
• Spokane Community College
• Grays Harbor College
or any SAF-accredited forestry or natural resource program.

Complete and return the following application form to WASIC postmarked no later than April 1, 2022. The successful applicant will be notified in early June. Electronic application forms are available on the Washington SIC website: www.wasfi.org. Applications must be submitted in paper form to the address on the application.

The mission of the Washington State SFI Implementation Committee is to promote and foster an understanding of the Sustainable Forestry Initiative and to promote sustainable forestry practices on all forestlands in the state.

The current core priorities for the WASIC are to:
• Establish criteria and identify delivery mechanisms for contractor (e.g. logger) and forester training;
• Establish protocols for addressing inconsistent practices;
• Focus landowner outreach efforts on education and technical assistance;
• Focus public outreach efforts on increasing SFI program recognition and support among local opinion
leaders and forestry professionals;
• Protect the integrity of the SFI program;
• Support the efforts of state and federal agencies to report harvest and regeneration statistics.

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